Physics

Nobel physics laureate urges scientists to stand against ‘nationalism’

Stand against ‘nationalism’: Nobel physics laureate It’s important that scientists keep their international community at a time when the world is not so nice, Aspect said AFP, Stockholm, Oct 04 2022, 18:51 ist updated: Oct 04 2022, 18:51 ist France’s Alain Aspect, who won the Nobel Physics Prize on Tuesday with John Clauser of the …

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Despite a retraction, a room-temp superconductor claim isn’t dead yet

It may be too soon to mourn the demise of a room-temperature superconductivity claim. On September 26, the journal Nature retracted a paper describing a material that seemed to turn into a superconductor at a cozy 15° Celsius (SN: 10/14/20). The notice rattled many people in the field. But a new experiment performed just days …

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A new toolbox for elucidating future quantum materials

The data from neutron scattering (left) provide information about absorbed energies in reciprocal space. With the new evaluation, it has been possible to obtain statements about new magnetic states and their temporal development in real space (right). The colors blue and red indicate the two opposite spin directions. Credit: HZB/ORNL Neutron scattering is considered the …

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Passage Of A Proton Through Water Solves A 200-Year-Old Mystery

A model for how protons pass through water has been vindicated using X-ray spectroscopy. Astonishingly, the model it replaces dates back to 1806, despite the fact that protons were not discovered until more than 100 years later. In the early 19th Century, the discovery of the electric cell made many experiments in electricity possible, but …

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Beg all you want – these beer game devs will not break the laws of physics for you

What happens when players want something that the game developers aren’t willing to budge on? Well, the team behind the indie game Brewmaster knows the answer all too well. When testers started to complain about the water pressure of the taps, it “caused a bit of a divide” within the studio, says associate designer Ellie …

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Cosmic ray protons reveal new spectral structures at high energies

Observation of Spectral Structures in the Flux of Cosmic-Ray Protons from 50 GeV to 60 TeV with the Calorimetric Electron Telescope on the International Space Station. Credit: Waseda University Cosmic rays constitute high-energy protons and atomic nuclei that originate from stars (both within our galaxy and from other galaxies) and are accelerated by supernovae and …

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How stiff is the proton?

Compton scattering setup at the High Intensity Gamma Ray Source. The central cylinder is the liquid hydrogen target. High energy gamma rays are scattered from the liquid hydrogen into eight large detectors that measure the gamma rays’ energy. Credit: Mohammad Ahmed, North Carolina Central University and Triangle Universities Nuclear Laboratory The proton is a composite …

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Black holes can’t swallow information about what they swallow—and that’s a problem

Aaron Horowitz/Getty Images Three numbers. Just three numbers—that’s all it takes to completely, unequivocally, 100 percent describe a black hole in general relativity. If I tell you the mass, electric charge, and spin (ie, angular momentum) of a black hole, we’re done. That’s all we’ll ever know about it and all we’ll ever need to …

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Potential first traces of the universe’s earliest stars

Massive, Population III Stars in the Early Universe. This artist’s impression shows a field of Population III stars as they would have appeared a mere 100 million years after the Big Bang. Astronomers may have discovered the first signs of their ancient chemical remains in the clouds surrounding one of the most distant quasars ever …

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